ISSN(Print): 2708-2105 - ISSN(Online): 2709-9458 - ISSN-L: 2708-2105
 

The Use of Symbols (Emoticons) in Social Media: A Shift of Language from Words to Symbols

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Abstract

Emojis is the fast-growing language in the world, attracting viewers and has a great impact on their minds. This research aims at exploring how the use of emoticons leads to the emergence of a new universal language preferred by youth, thus, inviting a shift from words to other symbols. This study is proceeding from a quantitative survey analysis of the international students at Eastern Mediterranean University, North Cyprus. A questionnaire was designed to conduct a survey and to collect data for this study. The relationship is measured by using a statistical correlation test. For the sample, 100 hundred students from different departments of the university were randomly selected. A proportionate sampling method of sampling technique was used to collect the data. It was found that social media has provided a platform for the use of emojis that not only makes communication easy and more user friendly but also adds to understanding in different age groups.

Authors

1-Liaqat Iqbal
Assistant Professor, Department of English, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, KP, Pakistan.

2-Farhad Safi
Assistant Professor, Department of Journalism and Mass Communication, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, KP, Pakistan.

3-Irfan Ullah
Assistant Professor, Department of English, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, KP, Pakistan.

Keywords

Emojis use, Communication Context, Emoticons, Symbols, University Students

DOI Number

10.31703/gmcr.2020(V-III).10

DOI Link

http://dx.doi.org/10.31703/gmcr.2020(V-III).10

Page Nos

124-135

Volume & Issue

V - III

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

Published: Sep 2020

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